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Law and Inequality (Tani/Ossei-Owusu)
Spring 2021   LAW 526-001  

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Meeting Times/Location
R 3:00PM - 5:40PM

Faculty
Karen M. Tani

Seaman Family University Professor

ktani@law.upenn.edu
Shaun Ossei-Owusu

Presidential Assistant Professor of Law

oss@law.upenn.edu
Additional Information

Skills Training
Expository Writing
Other Professional Skills: analyzing and critiquing legal scholarship

Grading
10% Participation,
80% Exam,
10% Other (short reading responses)

Exam
Essay,
Take Home,
Partial Open Book (The student may consult all course materials, but not materials from outside the class.)

Satisfies Senior Writing Requirement

No

Location

Class meets online.

Course Continuity
Students are encouraged to stay home if you are ill or experience flu-like symptoms. If you miss a class for any reason, it is still your responsibility to make up the work missed.

I offer the following to students who miss class due to illness:

- Class sessions are regularly recorded. I will make these recordings routinely available on the course site to everyone in the class.

- I will make PowerPoint slides or other class materials routinely available on the course site to everyone in the class.

Category
First-Year

Credits
3.0

Inequality is a pressing concern to many people who pursue legal education, but rarely does law school coursework allow students to study inequality in a sustained, multi-faceted way. This course aims to fill that need, by introducing students to cutting-edge legal research on the relationship between law and inequality, as well as to some of the classic scholarship and case law that informs this fields. Roughly half of our class sessions will involve external speakers, who will discuss a work-in-progress or recent publication. Speakers have been chosen with the aim of showcasing different areas of law (e.g., immigration law, business law, criminal law, property law); different axes of inequality (e.g., income, race, gender, ability, sexuality); and different disciplinary approaches (e.g., history, political science, economics, sociology). This course may be of particular interest (but is not limited) to students who imagine careers in public interest and public service, students who are interested in legal academia, and students who want to become educated and discerning consumers of legal scholarship. Evaluation will be based on class participation, short reading responses, and a take-home final exam (essay). This class is scheduled to meet remotely, but if conditions permit, we will also provide opportunities for in-person interaction.

Course Concentrations

Perspectives on the Law Learning outcomes: Demonstrate an understanding of how the law affects, and is affected by, the individual course topic; Perform legal analysis in the context of the individual course topic; Communicate effectively on the legal and other aspects of the individual course topic; Demonstrate the ability to use other disciplines to analyze legal issues relevant to the individual course topic, including economics, philosophy, and sociology, as appropriate.

Public Interest Learning outcomes: Demonstrate a core understanding of the varied legal aspects of public interest law; Perform legal analysis in the context of public interest law; Communicate effectively on topics related to public interest law; Demonstrate an understanding of how public interest law is connected to and affected by a wide variety of legal and regulatory structures and doctrines.

Equity and Inclusion Learning outcomes: Demonstrate a core understanding of the varied legal aspects of equity and inclusion; Perform legal analysis in the context of topics related to equity and inclusion; Communicate effectively on the legal aspects of equity and inclusion; Demonstrate an understanding of how equity and inclusion are connected to and affected by a wide variety of legal and regulatory structures and doctrines.